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What to Say When You Talk to Yourself (by Shad Helmstetter)

The title of this book was intriguing, but when I chose to read it, I wasn’t expecting much. I had picked it up simply because, during my 1982-2022 book challenge, I was desperately looking for a book originally published in 1986 and this fit the criteria. I was positively surprised by this book. I guess that sometimes when you don’t have expectations, good things can seem even better. This book is not about making you feel better, but rather about helping you achieve your goals… Read More »What to Say When You Talk to Yourself (by Shad Helmstetter)

The Language Instinct (by Steven Pinker)

I had heard a lot about Steven Pinker, so when I saw one of his books, I didn’t think twice before buying it. He’s a professor of psychology at Harvard University and there’s a very long Wikipedia page about him. In this book, he speaks about the topic of language. He’s not a linguist, but a cognitive scientist, which means he focuses on how the brain processes and creates language. Can it get any more interesting than this? As someone who is passionate about understanding… Read More »The Language Instinct (by Steven Pinker)

My Stroke of Insights (by Jill Bolte Taylor)

You’re 37 years old and one morning, all of a sudden and without any prior warning, you notice that you cannot walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of your life. You’re a brain scientist and while you observe yourself and this situation that is unfolding, you recognise that you’re having a stroke. As you may have guessed, “My Stroke of Insights” is a memoir written by a neuroscientist, Jill Bolte Taylor, who experienced a stroke at the age of 37. She is also actively… Read More »My Stroke of Insights (by Jill Bolte Taylor)

Maria Montessori (by Grazia Honegger Fresco)

Maria Montessori is more well-known and appreciated abroad than in Italy. There are many books about her biography written in English that seem to be very well read and reviewed. In fact, her teaching method, which focuses on the individuality and autonomy of the child, is still incredibly popular today all over the world. This book, full of references to facts and events, covers Maria Montessori’s entire life: her years of training in which she was one of the first female doctors in Italy, the… Read More »Maria Montessori (by Grazia Honegger Fresco)

Start With Why (by Simon Sinek)

It’s amazing how such a simple concept can be so powerful, thought-provoking, and inspiring. The idea is that most successful leaders and organizations have one thing in common: they all start with “why”. This is another book, like “Eat That Frog“, that I started reading many years ago when I was running my own business but never finished. So, I took the opportunity to finally finish reading it. I bought the book because I had watched the TED talk (which now has over 60 million… Read More »Start With Why (by Simon Sinek)

The Little Book of Philosophy

The Little Book of Philosophy (by André Comte-Sponville)

The reason I chose to read this book is in its title: I was looking for something concise to read on the subject of philosophy. The author, a French philosopher, explores a variety of philosophical topics, including ethics, politics, love, death, knowledge, freedom, God, atheism, art, time, humanity, and wisdom. One aspect of the book that I particularly appreciated was its structure, with each chapter focused on a specific topic. This made the book easy to read in small chunks. Although the book is small… Read More »The Little Book of Philosophy (by André Comte-Sponville)

Eat That Frog (by Brian Tracy)

Do you want to increase your productivity, achieve your goals, and stop procrastinating? If so, you may be interested in the practical tips offered in this book. First of all, you must realise that it is impossible to complete every task you have to do, as the amount of time is limited, so the key to better managing your time is to prioritize tasks and focus on the most important ones first. This book encourages you to practice “creative procrastination” meaning that by prioritizing the… Read More »Eat That Frog (by Brian Tracy)

Peace Is Every Step (by Thich Nhat Hanh)

I kept having a smile on my face while I was reading this book. It made me feel calm and reminded me of “The wisdom of no escape” by Pema Chödrön. Thich Nhat Hanh was a Buddhist monk and peace activist who had a significant impact on Buddhism around the world and specifically he was one of the first to bring the concept of mindfulness to the West. In the 1960s, he worked to bring an end to the conflict in his native Vietnam through… Read More »Peace Is Every Step (by Thich Nhat Hanh)

Say Good Night to Insomnia

Say Good Night to Insomnia (by Gregg D. Jacobs)

I love to sleep. If I sleep, I can cope with (almost) everything, while if I don’t sleep well enough or for long enough, I can’t function properly. My brain slows down and hurts (I know that technically the brain can’t hurt but you know what I mean). Until about 5 years ago, I had never had any kind of insomnia issues, it was quite the opposite; I was able to sleep very well and for very long. I could even manage to sleep until… Read More »Say Good Night to Insomnia (by Gregg D. Jacobs)

The Universe in a Single Atom (by the Dalai Lama)

I don’t belong to Buddhism, but I have the highest admiration for its maximum authority, Tenzin Gyatso, the Dalai Lama XIV and, specifically, for his intelligence and openness towards others, including those who think differently from him. I always love listening to what he has to say, and I truly think his life enriches our world. This book is a confirmation of the consideration I have of him. The Dalai Lama’s genuine interest in science is well known and these pages are an opportunity to… Read More »The Universe in a Single Atom (by the Dalai Lama)